Need help from the ASRC? Call 03 9326 6066 (Monday – Friday, 10am – 5pm) or click here.
  • Stand with us

    Join our online community of compassionate supporters to stay informed on breaking news and ways you can take action and support refugees and people seeking asylum.
    Join now
  • A FAIR PROCESS

    The Government must immediately stop their unfair plan to rush through over 1,000 refugee application interviews by June 2021, denying people access to justice and a fair process.
    Join the call
  • Support Independence

    To stay independent, we don't accept funding from the Federal Government. Instead, we are funded by you.

    Support independence
    Donate now
  • Stand with us

    Join our online community of compassionate supporters to stay informed on breaking news and ways you can take action and support refugees and people seeking asylum.
    Join now
  • A FAIR PROCESS

    The Government must immediately stop their unfair plan to rush through over 1,000 refugee application interviews by June 2021, denying people access to justice and a fair process.
    Join the call
  • Support Independence

    To stay independent, we don't accept funding from the Federal Government. Instead, we are funded by you.

    Support independence
    Donate now
  • We’re looking for the next generation of leaders with lived experience of seeking asylum to take part in the Community, Advocacy and Power Program (CAPP).

    CAPP is a three-month intensive training program to equip people with lived experience of seeking asylum with the leadership skills necessary to become powerful advocates for the refugee community.

    Applications to join the Melbourne and Brisbane cohort close 28 May 2021.

    If you applied for a TPV or SHEV visa between 2015 and 2017 and have not already attended a Protection visa interview with the Department, please contact the ASRC urgently for legal assistance. CALL: 0422 035 324 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm) or email legal@asrc.org.au

    The application interview is your only chance to explain your case to the Department. Update your contact details with the Department to receive your Interview Invitation (the ASRC can also help you do this). 

    The recent release of more than 60 people transferred from Manus and Nauru for medical treatment from detention facilities in Australia into the community has been an important step in the right direction, however, the support provided to these men and women (and those released in the future) is only short-term and will soon end.

    Latest news

    Stories

      • 21 APR 21
      • 0
      An update on the end of the rent moratorium

      An update on the end of the rent moratorium

      Late last month the moratorium on rental evictions ended in Victoria and now hundreds of people seeking asylum are at risk of becoming homeless. The rental moratorium meant individuals and families were protected from being evicted if they fell behind in their rental payments during the pandemic because of a loss of income or work.

      Read more
      • 05 MAR 21
      • 0
      ‘Follow your Tongue’ by Niro

      ‘Follow your Tongue’ by Niro

      “You can use my recipes but you won’t be able to make my dishes the same as me. You are cooking unique to you. So you just have to follow your tongue.” Back home, I wasn’t really involved in cooking. But after I came to Australia, I was locked up for six years. 24 hours

      Read more
      • 03 MAR 21
      • 0
      ‘Cooking with love’ by Aheda

      ‘Cooking with love’ by Aheda

      “I have two secrets for cooking. The first, is not my secret but my country’s secret: ‘cook with your hands’. The second secret is love. You need to put some love in your cooking!” _ “I‘ve been cooking my whole life. In Palestine I was a chef and I ran a catering business. All my

      Read more
      • 01 MAR 21
      • 0
      The ASRC’s Preventing Homelessness Fund (for people released from detention)

      The ASRC’s Preventing Homelessness Fund (for people released from detention)

      The recent release of more than 60 people transferred from Manus and Nauru for medical treatment from detention facilities in Australia into the community has been an important step in the right direction, however, the support provided to these men and women (and those released in the future) is only short-term and will soon end.

      Read more